Blogs

March 16, 2018

How to Relax During Recovery

Relaxation is important for recovery. It reduces stress and anxiety. It improves sleep and makes you healthier. Unfortunately, it’s easier said than done. Much of the tension and anxiety you feel during early recovery is chemical. Your brain has not quite sorted out its levels of GABA, dopamine, and glutamate. It might be a while before you can relax deeply without chemical help, but taking time to relax will make other parts of recovery go better.

March 15, 2018

Why Relaxation is so Important for Recovery

With everything going on in detox, treatment, and recovery, relaxation is easy to overlook. We often talk about how recovery takes work. It takes self-discipline and facing uncomfortable truths. All this is true, but if you want to keep up all that hard work and self-discipline, you will need plenty of rest. Just as top athletes know that rest is part of training, you should remember that relaxation is part of recovery. Here’s why.

March 14, 2018

Why Humility is Important for Addiction Recovery

Humility is a part of recovery that is easy to overlook. People think about detox and meetings and therapy. They might even think about creating a healthier lifestyle, with friends who exert a more positive influence. However, none of this is possible without humility.

March 13, 2018

Should You Exercise During Withdrawal?

Detox is not pleasant. Depending on what you’re quitting and how long you used, you might have headaches, irritability, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, aches, tremors, hallucinations, or seizures, and insomnia. Still, if you feel up to it, a bit of physical activity might help you feel better.

March 12, 2018

How to Choose a Sponsor in AA

Not everyone needs a sponsor, but most people could use all the help they can get. If you’re new to a 12 Step program, or just thinking about starting, here are some suggestions for choosing a sponsor.

March 9, 2018

What is the Pink Cloud?

The pink cloud is a feeling people sometimes experience early in recovery. It usually lasts a few weeks or months, sometimes as long as a year. It’s a sort of euphoria that comes from turning one’s life around--or at least feeling like one’s life has turned around. It’s often described as a sort of mystical experience. It’s as if turning one’s will over to to his Higher Power has suddenly cleared the path to all good things.

March 9, 2018

How to Keep Shame from Ruining Your Recovery

Guilt and shame are major drivers of addiction and relapse. They are difficult emotions to deal with because when you feel shame or guilt, you face a dilemma: you can either try to run from it, often by using, or you beat yourself up with it. Shame and guilt are hard to let go of because you feel like letting go means you condone your mistakes, and this is compounded by the feeling that by forgiving yourself, you open yourself to criticism from others.

March 7, 2018

How Goals Can Help Your Recovery

Setting goals can be an important tool for recovery. Setting realistic, concrete goals increases accountability and gives you a sense of purpose. Whether you’re already in recovery, or still thinking about it, setting goals for yourself can help you live a better life.

March 6, 2018

Overdoses are Usually More than One Drug

We usually think of overdoses being caused by one drug. We imagine someone overdosing on heroin, fentanyl, sleeping pills, or alcohol, but that’s not often the complete picture. For example, whenever a celebrity dies of an overdose, it’s never one drug. Philip Seymour Hoffman had heroin, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and amphetamines in his system. Heath Ledger died from a combination of oxycodone, hydrocodone, diazepam, temazepam, alprazolam, and doxylamine.

March 5, 2018

Proactivity vs Reactivity in Recovery

Proactive thinking is characterized by planning ahead and working toward a goal in a coherent way. Reactive thinking is more like being caught by surprise and scrambling to deal with a novel situation. Both are necessary in daily life, but if you rely too much on reactive thinking in recovery, you’re making things harder than they need to be.